Saturday, February 25, 2017

Let the Children Come to Me—RCIA Retreat 2017

Gina and I spent the day with our catechumens and candidates today, After the first of three talks, we had exposition and benediction. Here's my homily from that event.
Mark 10:13–16
            Gina and I have five grandchildren, and with most of them, I have gone through the stage in which it is very popular for them to come and cling to me and hang on me, and just otherwise want to be around me. I'm good with that for a while, but it also happens that often the times that they can come to visit are the very times when I have limited free time to get various things done. So at a certain point, I'm not as accessible or generous as I'd like to be. I feel badly for admitting that, but it's simply the truth. Perhaps when I retire, I'll be less stingy with my time. I hope that is the case.
            But I'm always charmed to see young fathers with their toddlers in public, particularly at parks where there is so much to explore and so many new things to encounter. I do remember those times when my daughter was just beginning to verbalize, and she'd toddle up holding something in her hand and hand it to me and say something unintelligible but with obvious inflection: "What is this?" or "This is such and such" or even "Wow, this is amazing." If you have children, I know you know what I mean. This is one of those great moments in parenting.
            That's how I envision God in the Garden of Eden with Adam after He formed him from the dust of the ground and breathed life into him. After placing Him, His new offspring, into the garden, He realizes that man needs helpers, so He creates animals, and brings each one of them to man to name. I can see the Father presenting to his human son each animal, and the man looking each in the face and uttering something that would be as incomprehensible to us as those babblings of our own children. And I think of how God delights in it and gets such a kick out of man at his important task of naming the animals.
            God the Father is a much better papa than I am. Thank goodness I have His example to follow.
            I see the same dynamic in the reading this morning. The apostles and I have a lot in common. We see the children not through the eyes of the Father or our loving savior, but through our own concerns—the daily anxieties and cares that prevent us from seeing what truly matters. Jesus will have none of it. "Let the children come to me; do not prevent them, for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these."
            The Kingdom of God belongs to those who flock to Jesus, who reach for Him and wish to be held by Him. And He picks them up and blesses each of them. That's the generosity of spirit that I wish I had. I guess I'm happy that I wish I had it. That's a start.
            Anyway, look at what Jesus tells his disciples: "Whoever does not accept the Kingdom of God like a child will not enter into it." Elsewhere it says, "Unless you turn and become like children, you'll not enter the kingdom." Now notice that the acceptance is a two-way street. Jesus is receptive to the children, and the children are eager to be with Jesus. It begins with Jesus' openness to the children, but the children are likewise completely open to Jesus.
            That is our goal. I would like to be as generous as Jesus with my grandchildren, but maybe the way that I begin is by being completely open to Jesus to start. After all, all of the gifts we have come from God. To have the gift to give, we must first receive it from the giver of all gifts. So for me to be able to give that gift of generous, gratuitous love to my grandchildren, I have to be completely open to God's love for me. I have to become a child in His presence. Or perhaps more accurately, I have to recognize that I am a child in His eyes and respond accordingly.
            Beyond that, we need to understand what this passage does and does not say. It is not telling us to believe as children believe. That would be completely inappropriate for adults. We should believe with an adult faith and understanding of God—not a faith of mindless, blind obedience, but faith seeking understanding. But what the children have and what we often luck is complete trust. While we may not always understand, we must always remember that God is a God of love who does not aim to deceive us but desires to embrace us. Let us reach out to Him with that same child-like trust in His love.


Post a Comment